Traditional Aikido – Vol.1 Basic techniques


Traditional Aikido – Vol.1 Basic techniques (Morihiro Saito – 8th dan)


As taught by the Founder to the Author, Aikido is an extremely efficient and versatile martial art.   It does not rely upon a weapon or weapons but shows that the body movements are the same whether one holds a weapon or not.

 The term   riai means, literally, a blending of truths.   By understanding Aikido through riai, one sees that the taijutsu techniques were developed from movements using the sword.   Therefore, training with the sword will develop taijustu technique.

 The Founder said that a weapon should be used as an extension of the body. However, he stressed that one should not develop a dependence upon a particular weapon. To build this feeling, one should practice the basic exercises of ken and jo suburi, tai no henko, and kokyu dosa consistently.   A good understanding of these basic exercises will enable the practitioner to move smoothly and surely with or without weapons.

 Explanations have purposely been kept at a minimum to encourage the reader to use the book as a guide to developing understanding through practice.


About the Author

Mr. Morihiro Saito was born inIbarakiPrefecturein March of 1928.   In July of 1946, he met and became the student of Professor Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, at the Ibaraki Outdoor Dojo in Iwama.      He lived at the dojo and worked hard for the Founder even though he held a regular job. So complete was his desire to learn Aikido and his devotion to the Founder, that after his marriage, instead of a honeymoon trip, he left his bride to train with Professor Ueshiba.

 At the New   Year Celebration in 1959 he became an instructor at the Main Headquarters Dojo inTokyo.   Through his Sunday morning practices at the Headquarters Dojo, he attracted many students by his personal character and enthusiasm for Aikido.

 He became head of the Ibaraki Dojo in April of 1969 after the death of the Founder.   Together with his wife, he also cares for the Aiki Shrine next to the dojo.    

In addition, he also regularly instructs at Kana-gawa,Ibaraki, Iwate, andTohokuGakuinUniversities, the Miyagi Branch Dojo and theJapanSelfDefenseForceArmyWeaponsSchoolin Tsuchiura.   Other Aikido groups inJapanand from abroad also come to the Ibaraki Dojo for instruction.


Foreword

This book intends to explain the fundamental relationships between the use of ken, jo, and taijutsu. It was written with the consideration that it should be used for actual practice. For this reason, there are many photographs to be used for reference and understanding of the techniques. Some explanation about the form of  the technique and necessary mental attitude has been used to augment the photographs.

A thorough understanding of basic techniques in the use of ken,  jo, and taijutsu is necessary when dealing with many opponents. To stress this point,   single movements  of  the basic Aikido exercises of tai-no-henko, and kokyu dosa are explained. Therefore,   the reader should pay particular attention to these basic exercises,   since  they are the basis of all Aikido movements.

This book emphasizes basic technique only. A second volume on advanced technique will be  published later. Recently, many foreign   students   have been coming to the Ibaragi Dojo to train.  For this reason,   the  English text has been included.

 Since space limitations did not allow a more detailed   explanation of the fundamental   techniques, the author welcomes,  from the reader, opinions based on actual  practice.

This book is dedicated in deep appreciation to the memory of Professor Morihei Ueshiba,  the founder of Aikido. The author would also like to express his gratitude to the second Doshu of  Aikido, Sensei  Kisshomaru Ueshiba, the instructors and students of  Hombu Dojo and Miyagi   Branch  Dojo, the photographer Mr. Sadao Hirata, Mrs, Takako Alexander who advised on the english translation of the text, and the editors of   Minato Research Co.  for their kind assistance and cooperation.


Content


Introduction…………………………………………………………………….11

 I.                   Basic Method of Aiki Sword

  1. Suburi ……………………………………………………………………...................……..23
  2. Partner Practice with Sword………………………………………..........…………..39
  3. Entering Method………………………………………………………..............………..51
  4. Tai no Henko……………………………………………………………................………61
  5. Sword and Body Relationship………………………………….........………………65
  6. Kokyù Ho………………………………………………………………...................……….79

 II.                Basic Method of Aiki Jò

  1. Suburi and 31 Count Kata…………………………………...........…………………81

Count Kata

Suburi

Thrusting Movements

Striking Movements

Wrist Movements

Figure Eight Movements

Flowing Movements

2.  Partner Practice with Jo……………………………………………...................………122

Pictures donated by Aikido Headquarters

Glossary……………………………………………………………………...…132