Traditional Aikido – Vol.2 Advanced techniques


Traditional Aikido – Vol.2 Advanced techniques (Morihiro Saito – 8th dan)


As taught by the Founder to the Author, Aikido is an extremely efficient and versatile martial art.   It does not rely upon a weapon or weapons hut shows that the body movements are the same whether one holds a weapon or not.

 The term   riai means, literally, a blending of truths.   By understanding Aikido through riai, one sees that the taijutsu techniques were developed from movements using the sword.   Therefore, training with the sword will develop taijustu technique.

 The Founder said that a weapon should be used as an extension of the body. However, he stressed that one should not develop a dependence upon a particular weapon. To build this feeling, one should practice the basic exercises of ken and jo suburi, tai no henko, and kokyu dosa consistently.   A good understanding of these basic exercises will enable the practitioner to move smoothly and surely with or without weapons.

 Explanations have purposely been kept at a minimum to encourage the reader to use the book as a guide to developing understanding through practice.


About the Author

 Mr. Morihiro Saito was born inIbarakiPrefecturein March of 1928.   In July of 1946, he met and became the student of Professor Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, at the Ibaraki Outdoor Dojo in Iwama.      He lived at the dojo and worked hard for the Founder even though he held a regular job. So complete was his desire to learn Aikido and his devotion to the Founder, that after his marriage, instead of a honeymoon trip, he left his bride to train with Professor Ueshiba.

 At the New   Year Celebration in 1959 he became an instructor at the Main Headquarters Dojo inTokyo.   Through his Sunday morning practices at the Headquarters Dojo, he attracted many students by his personal character and enthusiasm for Aikido.

 He became head of the Ibaraki Dojo in April of 1969 after the death of the Foun¬der.   Together with his wife, he also cares for the Aiki Shrine next to the dojo.       In addition, he also regularly instructs at Kami gawa,Ibaraki, Iwate, and Tohoku Gakuin Universities, the Miyagi Branch Dojo and theJapanSelfDefenseForceArmyWeaponsSchoolin Tsuchiura.   Other Aikido groups inJapanand from abroad also come to the Ibaraki Dojo for instruction.


FOREWORD

 The previous book covered the relationships between the basic techniques and practice methods of jo ken, and taijutsu. This volume explains the application and variations of the basic kumitachi as developed by the founder, Professor Morihei Ueshiba. Also the concept of Riai has been expanded to include kumijo and relationships between jô and taijutsu, taijutsu and ken, and ken and jo.

 In Aikidô, the kumitachi contain body movements according to the principles of Aiki. It is possible at any time during the kumitachi to change to taijutsu. The same holds true for the kumijô. However, it will be very difficult to switch to taijutsu, if one is dependent upon jô or ken. Therefore, for easier understanding the explanations have been made by use of detailed photographs. If the aim of the reader is to instruct in Aikidô, then this book should be considered necessary.

 I sincerely hope that the first volume, this book, and the third intended volume will help the reader to broaden his understanding and correctly grasp the principles of Aikidô.

 

In the publication of this book, the cooperation of SenseiGOzô Shiota of the Yôshinkan Dôjô, Sensei Shôji Nishio of Aikidô Headquarters Dôjô and Sensei Yasuo Kobayashi, through their donation of photographs, is deeply appreciated. I would also like to thank Shigemi Inagaki and Masaie Umezawa of the Ibaraki Dôjô for their participation in this book as well as in the previous one.


Content

Foreword……………………………………………………………………................…………...6

I. Sword Techniques

  1. Kumitachi………………………………………………………………….............…….24
  2. Kumitachi Variations…………………………………………………….......………40
  3. Tachidori………………………………………………………………………..............78
II. Jo Techniques
  1. Kmnijo……………………………………………………………………...........…….101
  2. Jotori……………………………………………………………………............………122
  3. Jo and Taijutsu Relationships……………………………………………..145
  4. Jo and Ken Relationships………………………………………………………158