Traditional Aikido – Vol.3 Applied techniques


Traditional Aikido – Vol.3 Applied techniques (Morihiro Saito – 8th dan)

As taught by the Founder to the Author, Aikido is an extremely efficient and versatile martial art.   It does not rely upon a weapon or weapons but shows that the body movements are the same whether one holds a weapon or not.

 The term   riai means, literally, a blending of truths.   By understanding Aikido through riai, one sees that the taijutsu techniques were developed from movements using the sword.   Therefore, training with the sword will develop taijustu technique.

 The Founder said that a weapon should be used as an extension of the body. However, he stressed that one should not develop a dependence upon a particular weapon. To build this feeling, one should practice the basic exercises of ken and jo suburi, tai no henko, and kokyu dosa consistently.   A good understanding of these basic exercises will enable the practitioner to move smoothly and surely with or without weapons.

 Explanations have purposely been kept at a minimum to encourage the reader to use the book as a guide to developing understanding through practice.

 

About the Author      

 Mr. Morihiro Saito was born inIbarakiPrefecturein March of 1928.   In July of 1946, he met and became the student of Professor Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, at the Ibaraki Outdoor Dojo in Iwama.      He lived at the dojo and worked hard for the Founder even though he held a regular job. So complete was his desire to learn Aikido and his devotion to the Founder, that after his marriage, instead of a honeymoon trip, he left his bride to train with Professor Ueshiba.

 At the New   Year Celebration in 1959 he became an instructor at the Main Headquarters Dojo inTokyo.   Through his Sunday morning practices at the Headquarters Dojo, he attracted many students by his personal character and enthusiasm for Aikido.

 He became head of the Ibaraki Dojo in April of 1969 after the death of the Founder.   Together with his wife, he also cares for the Aiki Shrine next to the dojo.       In addition, he also regularly instructs at Kana-gawa,Ibaraki, Iwate, andTohokuGakuinUniversities, the Miyagi Branch Dojo and theJapanSelfDefenseForceArmyWeaponsSchoolin Tsuchiura.   Other Aikido groups inJapanand from abroad also come to the Ibaraki Dojo for instruction.

 

FOREWORD

 Volume 3 has been devoled exclusively to the introduction of AIKIDO techniques involving the use of the body. These techniques are almost unlimited in number and it was simply out of the question to include all of them in a book of this size. The techniques in this book were picked entirely at the discretion of the author who sought, in selecting them, to establish some contexual correlation between pertinent techniques. Some of the techniques may well be construed as derivatives from the standard AIKIDO repertory. The author attempted to make the explanations about the techniques as simple and as clearcut as possible. As an invaluable aid, I took the liberty of quoting the words bequeathed by Founder Morihei Uyeshiba, which represent the "heart of techniques" in such a concise and incisive manner. These quotes should make my remarks sound superfluous.

 I recall that the filming of the first and second volumes was completed in July and September last year, respectively. It was around that time that NHK decided to take up AIKIDO as one ofJapan's traditional martial arts in its overseas-oriented program titled "INTRODUCTION TO JAPAN". An NHK team visited our Dojo at Iwama,IbarakiPrefecture, for the location filming. I am pleased to hear that this worthy project was successfully completed. 1 wish to thank Mr. Hiroaki Otawa and Mr. Hironari Inagaki of the NHK International Bureau, as well as the filming staff, for their fine work and contribution to the cause of AIKIDO. I am particularly grateful to Mr. Otawa, who is known to be dedicated, body and soul, to the world of martial arts. I sincerely wish him success in establishing a wider recognition of Japanese martial arts overseas.

In the meantime, I have learned that Minato Research & Publishing Co., Ltd. has decided to film my exercises in 8mm movies as a teaching aid. It is highly recommended that the readers use these movies as a supplemental aid to my books.

 

CONTENTS

 Foreword…………………………………………………………………………………12

Bodily Adaptation of"Principle of swordsmanship" …………………………………….18

Body Kxercisesanil Their Unii in iteti Hamificalions

I . Variations in Kokyn-lio

1.         Kokyu-ho in the sitting posture

Basic pattern ……………………………………………………………………………..22

Wrist held from below…………………………………………………………………...24

Wrist held from above…………………………………………………………………...25

Wrist pinned …………………………………………………….………………………26

Wrist held with full force……………………………………..………………………….27

Elbow joints pinned……………………………………………………………………...28

2.         Kokyu-ho in the standing posture

Basic pattern …………………………………………………………………………….30

Wrist twisted…………………………………………………………………………….32

Wrist held up………………………………….…………………………………………34

Wrist held down………………………………………………………………………….36

Hand grasped on the hack………………………………………………………………..36

 

II. Variations of Basic Techniques

1.Sitting : Shomen-uchi

Omote-waza (Front technique)…………………………………………………………..40

Ura-waza (Turning technique)…………………………………………………………...42

2.Standing : Shomen-uchi Dai-Ikkyo……………….…………………………………...44

Ura-waza…………………………………………………………………………………49

3.Standing : Shomen-uchi Dai-Nikyo (WriMtura)

Omote-waza ……………………………………………………………………………..50

Ura-waza ………………………………………………………………………………...52

4.Standing : Shomen-uchi Dai-Sankyo (Arm twist)

Omote-waza ……………………………………………………………………………..56

Ura-waza…………………………………………………………………………………58

5. Standing : Shomen-uchi Dai-Yonkyo

Ornote-waza……………………………………………………………………………...61

Ura-wafa…………………………………………………………………………………61

IK'lli   (Cmular strike at thehead)     Dai-Gokvo (Defense against armed attacks)

Omote-waza……………………………………………………………………………...62

Ura-waza…………………………………………………………………………………64

7.Standing : Katate-dori (one hand bald) Shiho-nage

Mmote-waza……………………………………………………………………………..66

Ura-waza…………………………………………………………………………………69

8.Ki Flow ami Blending iRyotedon or hand hold. Shiho-nagel

 Standing: Yokomen-uchi Shiho-nage…………………………………………………...72

10.Standing : Kata-dori(SaoaMn hold)Shiho-nage…………………………………..….74

11.Hanmi-Handachi-waza (SHtiag vs.standing marciK) Katate-dori Shiho-nage………76

12.HanmiRyote-dori Shiho-nage………………………………………………………...77

13.Standing: Yokomen-uchi Kotegaeshi………………………………………………...79

Remarks cm Kotegaeshi ………………………………………………………………...80

14. Standing : kaiten-nage iRoiary throw) ………………………………………………82

Uchi-mawari (inward)

15. Standing : Kaiten-nage

Soto-mawari  (oatward)………………………………………………………………….84

I6. Ki  Flow and Blending(Inward rotary throw) ……………………………………….85

17.Shomen-uchi Irimi-nage……………………………………………………………...88

Shomen-uchi Irimi-nage…………………………………………………………………90

Shomen-uchi Irimi-nage…………………………………………………………………91

Remarks tin Irimi-nage…………………………………………………………………..92

How to perform Irimi-nage ……………………………………………………………...93

18.Ryote-dori Irimi-nage……………………...…………………………………………94

19.Kata-dori Irimi-nage When diverting the attack rightward………………...………...96

When diverting the attack leftward………………………………………………………97

20.Mo rote-d On    (two hands holding our hand) Irimi-nage

When turning the arm from above……………………………………………………….98

When tinning the arm from below……………………………………………………...100

21. Hanmi-I lamlachi-waza

Shomen-uchi Irimi-nage………………………………………………………………..102

22.Tenchi-nage (iieaven-tarth throw)…………………………………………………..104

23.Kokyu-nage (Abdominal breath throw)

Tekubi………………………………………………………………………………….106

Sode-guchi (Cuff held)…………………………………………………………………107

Sode   (Sleeve held)…………………………………………………………………….108

24.Jyuji-garami or Ayadori (Cross-twine throw)

Millie   (Lower lapel held)……………………………………………………………...112

Both hands held from behind…………………………………………………………...112

Mune held from behind…………………………………………………………………114

25.llshiro Eri-tori (Collar held from behind))Dai …………………………………..….116

26.       Ushiro Kokyu-nage

Collar held from behind(l)……………………………………………………………...118

Collar held from behind(2)……………………………………………………………..119

 

III. Modes of Variations

1.Koshi-nage (Hip throw)     Henka-waza (Variations)

(Variations from Koshi-nage to other techniques)

Koshi-nage(l)   …………………………………………………………………………..122

Koshi-nage(2)…………………………….…………………………………………….124

Koshi-nage(3)…………………………………………………………………………..125

Koshi-nage(4)…………………………………………………………………………..126

Henka-waza(5)…………………………………………………………………………127

Henka-waza(6)………………………………………………………………………….128

2.Variations to basic techniques (Irimi-nage)

Ushiro  Ryote-dori   (Both hands held from behind)…………………………………...130

Ushiro Eri-tori Irimi-nage………………………………………………………………133

Ushiro Eri-tori Irimi-nage (Collar twisted from behind)……………………………….134

3.UshirO-waza  (Techniques against rear attacks) Variations

Ushiro Eri-tori Shiho-nage……………………………………………………………...136

Ushiro Eri-tori Kote-gaeshi…………………………………………………………….138