Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method


Bruce Lee’s Fighting Method – Bruce Lee


BRUCE LEE-1940 1973

 

Bruce Lee flashed brilliantly like a meteor through the world of martial arts and motion pictures. Then, on July 20, 1973, inHong Kong, like a meteor—he vanished, extinguished by sudden death. He was just 32.

Bruce Lee began his martial arts studies with wing chun, under the tutelage of the late Yip Man, to alleviate the personal insecurity instilled byHong Kongcity life. Perhaps because his training enveloped him to the point of fanaticism, he was eventually able to refine, distill and mature into a philosopher, technician and innovator of the martial arts.

After intensive study of different martial arts styles and theories, Lee developed a concept of martial arts for the individual man. This concept he later labeled Jeet Kune Do, the way of the intercepting fist. It has antecedents not only in his physical training and voluminous martial arts library (over two thousand books), but in his formal education as well (a philosophy major at theUniversityofWashington,Seattle).

Lee also combined his martial arts expertise with his knowledge of acting skills and cinematic techniques, starring in several motion pictures: The Big Boss, Fists of Fury, Way of the Dragon and Enter the Dragon.


INTRODUCTION

 

This book was in the making in 1966 and most of the photographs were shot then. The late Bruce Lee intended to publish this book years ago but decided against it when he learned that martial arts instructors were using his name to promote themselves. It was quite common to hear comments like: "I taught Bruce Lee" or "Bruce Lee taught me jeet kune do." And Bruce may never have seen or known these martial artists.

Bruce didn't want people to use his name to promote themselves or their schools with false pretenses. He didn't want them to attract students this way, especially the young teens.

But after his death, his widow, Linda, felt that Bruce had contributed so much in the world of the martial arts that it would be a great loss if the knowledge of Bruce would die with him. Although the book can never replace the actual teaching and knowledge that Bruce Lee possessed, it will enhance you, the serious martial artist, in developing your skill in fighting.

Bruce always believed that all martial artists train diligently for one single purpose—to defend themselves. Whether we are in judo, karate, aikido, kung fu, etcetera, our ultimate goal is to prepare ourselves for any situation.

To train yourself for this goal, you must train seriously. Nothing is taken for granted. "You have to kick or punch the bag with concentrated efforts," Bruce used to say. "If you are going to train without the concept that this is the real thing, you are short-changing yourself. When you kick or punch the bag, you have to imagine that you are actually hitting an adversary. Really concentrating, putting 100 percent in your kicks and punches, is the only way you are going to be good."

In order to understand this book more clearly, you should also read two other books to be published in the future. One is Bruce Lee's basic training methods, and the other is a thorough application of his techniques. Most of the photos in this book and the next two have never been published before.

If you have not read Too of Jeet Kune Do by Bruce Lee (Ohara Publications, Inc.), please read it. It was meant to complement this book, and the knowledge from both books will give you a full picture of Bruce's art.


CONTENTS

 

CHAPTER I

Defense Against Surprise Attack………………………………………………………11

CHAPTER II

Defense Against An Unarmed Assailant……………………………………………….21

CHAPTER III

Defense Against Grabbing………………………………………………………………35

CHAPTER IV

Defending Against Choke Holds and Hugs……………………………………………57

CHAPTER V

Self-Defense Against An Armed Assailant…………………………………………….69

CHAPTER VI

Defense Against Multiple Assailants……………………………………………………97

CHAPTER VII

Defense From A Vulnerable Position     …………………………………………………..115