Pentjak-Silat (The Indonesian Fighting Art)


Pentjak-Silat (The Indonesian Fighting Art) – Howard Alexander, Quintin Chambers, Don F. Draeger


Preface

 

What we present in this book is an introductory approach to the fascinating but relatively little-known combative art ofIndonesiathat is called "pentjak-silat." We shall outline briefly the background and essentials of the art and then the technical characteristics of some major pentjak-silat styles. In presenting a composite, overall picture of various tactics and training methods, we will illustrate the features that are intrinsic to the art, but we shall not attempt an exhaustive treatment of any one style.

To the beginner, pentjak-silat may appear to be identical with—or at any rate highly similar to—what has come to be popularly known as "karate" (more correctly, karate-do or karate-jutsu). There are, however, many technical differences between the two arts, though both, it is true, feature the many ways a man may use his body to dodge or ward off attacks as well as the many ways he may retaliate against an attack by striking or kicking his assailant. To the untrained eye, these will appear to be similar actions, and although they in fact are not, pentjak-silat remains of special interest to karate enthusiasts.

By studying the book carefully and then by practicing the exercises, the reader will soon become aware of some of these technical differences. Although this knowledge is in itself of value, the distinctions will constitute only separate, acquired skills unless they are integrated through a formal study of pentjak-silat. Further, when these techniques are added to a substantial basic knowledge of karate, they form a source for surprisingly new and useful abilities both in original combat situations and in sport.

We began, necessarily, where all orthodox pentjak-silat training does—with empty-hand skills, and continued on to armed combat. In our study, we were faced with various difficulties. For one thing, the Indonesian climate can be a trying one; and for another, transportation in remote areas is uncertain. Sometimes, because of that fact, we were able to view much excellent technique only once, when we would have liked to study it far more thoroughly. Nonetheless, one of our major problems in compiling the book was that of selection. Although we investigated some sixty major pentjak-silat styles, space limitations have permitted us to deal explicitly with only about ten. We chose, naturally, those that seemed to us to be the most interesting and useful —and we hope that the reader will agree.

All the technical data that follows, as well as the photographs, were obtained by the authors in Java, Madura, Sumatra, andBali, from native experts and exponents of the art, to all of whom we would like to express our grateful acknowledgement, as well as to the many government officials who assisted us: without the unlimited hospitality they extended to us, and without the generous use of their facilities, this book would not have been possible. Specifically, we would like to express our thanks to Mr. Dirt-moatdjo and the members of Perisai Diri, to George Pan-touw, to Dr. Go Yauw Liem and family, to Colonel Sunarjo, Bambang Soedarjanto Jr., to Heiro T.H.S., to Mr. and Mrs. The, to Mr. Atma of Tjimande, to all officials and members of Mustika Kwitang and Tjingkrik, on Java; to Mr. Swetja and the members of Perisai Diri, to Mr. Ida Bagus Oka Diwangkara and Mr. Alit and other officials of Bhakti Negara, on Bali; to Hasan Hubudin of Pamur and his group on Madura; to Mr. Amir Gunawan, Mr. Yusaf Munir, to Mr. Alikusuma, to Mr. Cheam Gek Chin, to Mr. Gan Ho Lay, to Mr. Munap Malin Mudo and the members of Patai, to Mr. Sjech Barinjin, Mr. Rasul Hamdi, Mr. Harum Said, Mr. Djarios, and Mr. Mendang of IPSI, and all the officers and members of Kumango, Baru, and Harimau organizations in Sumatra.

 

Contents

 

Preface……………………………………………………………………………………. 7

Pentjak-silat Past and Present …………………………………………………………11

Weapons ……………………………………………………………………………….18

Techniques against Armed Attacks…………………………………………………… 33

Basic Postures for Combat ……………………………………………………………. 48

Training Exercises……………………………………………………………………… 60

Combat Situations ……………………………………………………………………...106